Winter Kale Caesar Salad

 

It’s pretty difficult to improve on something as simple and classic as a Caesar salad, but we managed to do it when we developed our Organic Kale Caesar Chopped Salad Kit with crisp chopped romaine, kale, radicchio, parmesan cheese, garlic Romano crouton crumbles, and our delightful Caesar dressing. But then our friend, The College Housewife, came up with an innovative recipe that takes it to another level.

This Winter Kale Caesar Salad incorporates sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts, pecans, and, yes, pomegranates, into the Organic Kale Caesar Chopped Salad Kit. The result? A hearty and filling salad bursting with a unique mix of flavors that’s perfect for the colder days and nights ahead. Oh, and it requires minimal effort to make.

 

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 F. Line a large sheet pan with parchment paper. Add sweet potatoes and Brussels Sprouts.
  2. Drizzle evenly with olive oil and sprinkle with cracked black pepper and kosher salt. Mix together and bake for 20 minutes or until the veggies are fork tender. Cool for 5 minutes or so before adding to the salad.
  3. Pour salad kit into one large bowl or two smaller ones. Evenly distribute salad toppings, pecans, pomegranate seeds, and roasted veggies. 
  4. Drizzle with Caesar Dressing and enjoy!

What’s the Deal with Pomegranates, Anyway?

Originally a product of the region that spans from modern-day Iran through Afghanistan and Pakistan to northern India, the pomegranate is an exceptional little fruit. Well, technically, it’s a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree in the family Lythraceae, but you get the idea.

At first, the apple-like outside of the pomegranate looks fairly innocuous and feels inedible, but once you open it, you’re greeted with hundreds of shiny, deep red, jewel-like seeds that are literally bursting with a tart flavor that’s slightly sweet.

Pomegranates are typically in season from October to March in our part of the world, which is why they’re so prevalent in the fall and winter seasons. You can obviously eat them right out of the husk, which is never a bad option, but pomegranates are also great for juicing or as a mixer for cocktails. Sprinkle some on your ice cream, add them to yogurt, or use them in chutneys and curries. Just make sure not to wear white clothing if you have to juice a bunch of them! Enjoy!

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What’s the Deal with Pomegranates, Anyway?

Originally a product of the region that spans from modern-day Iran through Afghanistan and Pakistan to northern India, the pomegranate is an exceptional little fruit. Well, technically, it’s a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree in the family Lythraceae, but you get the idea.

At first, the apple-like outside of the pomegranate looks fairly innocuous and feels inedible, but once you open it, you’re greeted with hundreds of shiny, deep red, jewel-like seeds that are literally bursting with a tart flavor that’s slightly sweet.

Pomegranates are typically in season from October to March in our part of the world, which is why they’re so prevalent in the fall and winter seasons. You can obviously eat them right out of the husk, which is never a bad option, but pomegranates are also great for juicing or as a mixer for cocktails. Sprinkle some on your ice cream, add them to yogurt, or use them in chutneys and curries. Just make sure not to wear white clothing if you have to juice a bunch of them! Enjoy!

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